I decided to come back and post some again.  I might not post every day or every week, but I have decided to post again to Kentucky Tort Journal. I realize I miss posting my opinions and analysis of important Kentucky law.  More importantly, I miss letting people know my opinions on certain cases.  So, for what it is worth, I’m going to post again.  So, keep a lookout.  You might find something interesting.

After several years, several changes, and more than several posts it is with a heavy heart that I advise my readers that the Kentucky Tort Journal is signing off.  I will no longer be posting or updating original posts or decisions.

Kentucky Tort Journal was my first attempt at blogging.  Starting in 2004, my goal was to find a platform where I could express my thoughts about events, articles, cases and decisions that dealt with my area of practice.  I also wanted to explore the new medium and had great hopes for its use among lawyers.  Many of my contemporaries have also faded into the blogosphere, leaving behind remnants in time of their thoughts about whatever topic they chose to write.  Perhaps that is the fate of the KTJ.  It is somewhat interesting to know that while the journal is no more, my thoughts and opinions will linger like graffiti on an old wall in an old town.  Passed rarely, if ever, but there nonetheless, its true impact forever lost to its time and those who lived it, one day to be replaced by something else, something new.

While I am officially signing off, I will keep publishing the blog, at least for the time being, as a kind of archive.  There is simply too much information, too many hours, to much hard work and thought to simply turn out the lights.  Perhaps one day, but for now I’ll just leave the light on and shut the door.

I still have great hopes for blogs and the bloggers who blog them. Whle I am wrapping up this chapter, I am readily involved in opening another.  I encourage each of you to view my new blog; Kentucky Accident Information at http://kyaccidentinfo.com.  Look around and check back.  While something quite different than the KTJ, I think it’s truly the next frontier for blogs in the legal field.

I want to end by thanking each of you who supported me throughout the past four years.  I am always amazed at the number of attorneys who read my stuff and the good things they had to say.  I can’t begin to say enough about the good friends I met through this blog, so I won’t.  I’ll just say thank you to them too.

So, thank you all.  God Bless.  Good night and good luck.

Ed

Today I discuss the Court of Appeals Minutes for August 29, 2008, and the interesting case of Lee v. Shower, MD and Maysville Obstetrics, a medical negligence case, which resulted after the death of an infant from complications during delivery.

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Lazy Days of Summer

August 8, 2008

It seems like only yesterday that I took a weeks vacation.  Of course, it wasn’t, although you would think so given my lack of postings.  Unfortunately, I am behind and summer seems to have zapped whatever motivation I have had to write about the law.  Or, maybe, I am just really, really, busy.  Running your own law practice is a heck of lot harder then being an employee of another.  I have been given, when asked; “What do you do?”, to saying; “I am a lawyer, I practice law in my free time.” This is exactly how I feel.  When I am not running my practice, I am practicing the law.  That has left my little “hobby” far down on my list of things to do.

In either event, I hope to get back on track.  Look for postings on the Court of Appeals Minutes and interesting tort and insurance cases.  I’ll start with this weeks minutes and work my way backwards.  While some would argue that doesn’t make sense, I found it’s easier to get a grasp on what’s happening and then when I have time, blog about what has happened.  Besides, if my readers are anything like me, I imagine the lazy days of summer have an equally firm grasp on them too and reading my blog isn’t necessarily on the top of their lists, either.

The Mass Tort Litigation Blog has been reporting on the United States Supreme Court’s decision in Exxon v. Baker, the decision which reconsidered the punitive damages in the case arising out of the Exxon Valdez disaster. I’d recommend you read Professor Lahav’s wonderful musings in What’s So Weird About the Exxon Decision and Professor Stier’s background article SCOTUS Reduces Exxon Oil Spill Punitive Damages to Match Compensatory Damages for the ruling and its implication for future punitive damages recovery.

MSN Money has a very interesting and informative article styled “basic advice, plus 22 tips to help you protect yourself and get the best value for the money you spend on automobile coverage.” Here’s an excerpt:

Your car insurance rates are based on a few factors you can’t readily change — your sex, age, marital status and where you live — and many that you can — your credit scores, what you drive, how well you drive and how much coverage you buy. Here’s how to get the best deal.

Click here, to read the entire article.

The Supreme Court published Jones v. Cross, which dealt with whether or not the Sheriff’s Office was entitled to official immunity for the acts of its deputies, and if so, whether KRS 70.040 waives it.  Sheriff’s deputy injured two state troopers while attempting to catch an evading suspect.  The liability of the deputy was not an issue.  The liability of the Sheriff’s Office for the actions of his deputies was.

After reviewing the common law the Court declared the Sheriff’s Office immune from suit under the doctrine of absolute official immunity.  The true question was whether KRS 70.040 wiaved this immunity.  The Court found it had.  It noted:

A literal or plain reading of the statute clearly imposes liability on the sheriff in his official capacity for acts committed by his deputies . In construing a statute, words must be given their literal, usual, and ordinary meaning unless they have acquired a technical meaning .

The Supreme Court affirmed the appellate court’s opinion, overruling the trial court, which had found KRS 70.040 did not waive immunity.

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